Who Cares for Older Adults? A Cross-National Study of Care Sources for Older Adults With Functional Limitations and Associated Determinants

Dexia Kong, Peiyi Lu, Bei Wu, Joan K. Davitt, Mack Shelley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The study compared care source typologies for older adults in China and the United States. Data from the 2014 U.S. Health and Retirement Study and the 2013 China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study were used. The respondents included community-dwelling older adults aged 65 years or older with at least one limitation in activities of daily living (ADLs) or instrumental ADLs (IADLs) (N China = 2476, N US = 2898). Respondents reported whether they received assistance from spouse, child/grandchild, relatives, others, and formal helpers. Latent class analysis and multinomial logistic regression were applied. Four classes were identified in China and the U.S, separately. In both countries, ADLs and IADLs were strong determinants of care source typologies. Care sources were more diverse and included formal assistance among older Americans. Older Chinese relied largely on their spouses and children/grandchildren for support. Policy efforts are needed to expand formal long-term services and supports, particularly in China.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Applied Gerontology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2024

Keywords

  • cross-national study
  • latent class analysis
  • long-term services and supports
  • source of care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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