Who should have access to my pointing data? privacy tradeoffs of adaptive assistive technologies

Foad Hamidi, Kellie Poneres, Aaron Massey, Amy Hurst

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Customizing assistive technologies based on user needs, abilities, and preferences is necessary for accessibility, especially for individuals whose abilities vary due to a diagnosis, medication, or other external factors. Adaptive Assistive Technologies (AATs) that can automatically monitor a user's current abilities and adapt functionality and appearance accordingly offer exciting solutions. However, there is an often-overlooked privacy tradeoff between usability and user privacy when designing such systems. We present a general privacy threat model analysis of AATs and contextualize it with findings from an interview study with older adults who experience pointing problems. We found that participants had positive attitude towards assistive technologies that gather their personal data but also had strong preferences for how their data should be used and who should have access to it. We identify a need to seriously consider privacy threats when designing assistive technologies to avoid exposing users to them.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationASSETS 2018 - Proceedings of the 20th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery, Inc
Pages203-216
Number of pages14
ISBN (Electronic)9781450356503
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 8 2018
Event20th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility, ASSETS 2018 - Galway, Ireland
Duration: Oct 22 2018Oct 24 2018

Publication series

NameASSETS 2018 - Proceedings of the 20th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility

Conference

Conference20th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility, ASSETS 2018
CountryIreland
CityGalway
Period10/22/1810/24/18

Fingerprint

Data privacy

Keywords

  • Adaptive Systems
  • Assistive Technology
  • Essential Tremors
  • Older Adults
  • Pointing
  • Privacy
  • Threat Modeling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Hardware and Architecture
  • Software

Cite this

Hamidi, F., Poneres, K., Massey, A., & Hurst, A. (2018). Who should have access to my pointing data? privacy tradeoffs of adaptive assistive technologies. In ASSETS 2018 - Proceedings of the 20th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility (pp. 203-216). (ASSETS 2018 - Proceedings of the 20th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility). Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. https://doi.org/10.1145/3234695.3239331

Who should have access to my pointing data? privacy tradeoffs of adaptive assistive technologies. / Hamidi, Foad; Poneres, Kellie; Massey, Aaron; Hurst, Amy.

ASSETS 2018 - Proceedings of the 20th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, 2018. p. 203-216 (ASSETS 2018 - Proceedings of the 20th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Hamidi, F, Poneres, K, Massey, A & Hurst, A 2018, Who should have access to my pointing data? privacy tradeoffs of adaptive assistive technologies. in ASSETS 2018 - Proceedings of the 20th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility. ASSETS 2018 - Proceedings of the 20th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility, Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, pp. 203-216, 20th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility, ASSETS 2018, Galway, Ireland, 10/22/18. https://doi.org/10.1145/3234695.3239331
Hamidi F, Poneres K, Massey A, Hurst A. Who should have access to my pointing data? privacy tradeoffs of adaptive assistive technologies. In ASSETS 2018 - Proceedings of the 20th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. 2018. p. 203-216. (ASSETS 2018 - Proceedings of the 20th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility). https://doi.org/10.1145/3234695.3239331
Hamidi, Foad ; Poneres, Kellie ; Massey, Aaron ; Hurst, Amy. / Who should have access to my pointing data? privacy tradeoffs of adaptive assistive technologies. ASSETS 2018 - Proceedings of the 20th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, 2018. pp. 203-216 (ASSETS 2018 - Proceedings of the 20th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility).
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