Willingness of minorities to participate in biomedical studies: Confirmatory Findings from a follow-up study using the Tuskegee legacy project questionnaire

Ralph V. Katz, B. Lee Green, Nancy R. Kressin, Cristina Claudio, Min Qi Wang, Stefanie L. Russell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: The purposes of this analysis were to compare the self-reported willingness of blacks, Puerto-Rican Hispanics and whites to participate as research subjects in biomedical studies, and to determine the reliability of the Tuskegee Legacy Project Questionnaire (TLP). Methods: The TLP Questionnaire, initially used in a four-city study in 1999-2000, was administered in a follow-up study within a random-digit-dial telephone survey to a stratified random sample of adults in three different U.S. cities: Baltimore, MD; New York City; and San Juan, PR. The questionnaire, a 60-item instrument, contains two validated scales: the Likelihood of Participation (LOP) Scale and the Guinea Pig Fear Factor (GPFF) Scale. Results: Adjusting for age, sex, education, income and city, the LOP Scale was not statistically significantly different for the racial/ethnic groups (ANCOVA, p=87). The GPFF Scale was statistically significantly higher for blacks and Hispanics as compared to whites (adjusted ANCOVA, p<0.001). Conclusions: The of the findings from the current three-city study, as well as from our prior four-city study, are remarkably similar and reinforce the conclusion that blacks and Hispanics self-report that, despite having a higher fear of participation, they are just as likely as whites to participate in biomedical research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1052-1060
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the National Medical Association
Volume99
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 2007

Keywords

  • Minorities
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Research
  • Tuskegee Syphilis Study

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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